Ballroom in a Few Gifs #7

Seeing a whole floor of dancers breaking on 1 in mambo

 

Seeing 85% of the people in a rhythm event doing straight-up Latin technique

 

My arm styling

 

When someone wears an awful costume

 

When everyone tells you they can’t wait to see your new routines

 

Making that final when you thought you had no chance

 

Trying to shake hands with a judge while they are handing you your ribbon

Advertisements

Makeup Inspiration

I’ve been mildly addicted to watching YouTube makeup gurus lately, and it’s fun to see what they can do with makeup! Not all of it translates directly into ballroom makeup, which tends to be way more dramatic and verging on drag-queen level than even the most smoky party makeup, but there are a lot of great ideas and inspiration for incorporating into your competition or showcase makeup routine.  And, they show a lot of great techniques and tricks.  My current favorite look is a cut crease, so I will endeavor to try that at my next comp.  Maybe with some vampy lips if I’m feeling sassy.

I’ve also included beauty tutorials from ladies of different ethnicities, since I’ve noticed that there is not a huge amount of diversity in ballroom-specific makeup videos.

Bonus video! (Has nothing to do with ballroom makeup inspiration.) What the crap.  This girl is a-maz-ing.  I think I’ve gotten competition makeup down to maybe 15 minutes if I’m in a real hurry and everything is cooperating, but this takes mad skillz – check out how well she does that eyeliner wing in literally 3 seconds.  Also how quickly she puts on fake eyelashes!  Not to mention the rest of her videos, especially some of the crazy Halloween ideas.

Shopping for Your First Competition

For your handy-dandy convenience, I’ve done some research on the Internet in search of some affordable essential ballroom dance competition items for a first-time competitor.

Below is a list of some of my finds that total of under $250 for your first competition!  I suppose it might sound like a lot for a typical college student or first-time dancer in general, but once you have all of this stuff, you’re pretty set for the next few comps until you want to upgrade items or get a second pair of ballroom shoes.  It also assumes that you don’t have some essential things most people already have, such as makeup, a short party dress (for women, obviously), and a white shirt, black dress pants, and black socks (for men).  Click here for more information on ballroom attire, here for more information on makeup, or here for more information on shoes.

Women:

Grand Total: Approximately $232 – $280

A couple tips – colorwise, I’d suggest avoiding black and red for Latin outfits, since those are super common on the floor.  Go for neutral (shades of brown, gold, gray, or black) but dramatic eyeshadow if you’re not practiced in applying it, paired with a bright lip color like a dark pink or red.

Men:

Grand Total: Approximately $228 – $247

Experienced dancers, if you have any links to awesome online finds, please comment and share!

Ballroom in a Few Gifs #5 – Back to School Edition

Welcome back to school, all those who are still getting their formal education on!

Reuniting with all your dance friends whom you haven’t seen all summer

via giphy

When you and your partner realize you are in no shape to run rounds

via giphy

Newbies watching veterans dance

via tumblr

The brand-newbies just learned a cha cha basic!  

via giphy

Realizing that some of the freshmen were born in 1997

(new life goal: be out of grad school before the new freshmen were born in the 2000s)

via giphy

When your biggest rival just got way better this summer while you lazed around

via tumblr

How some home-made ballroom gowns look

via tumblr

What to expect at syllabus levels at collegiate competitions now that USA Dance costume rules have been relaxed

via tumblr

via newnownext.com

The Power of Mindset

Success is all about your mindset.  The struggle is just in your head.  Mindset matters.   These are all variants on a cliché we’ve heard plenty of times, probably a lot in sports especially.  But this is one of those cases in which the cliché reflects the truth, at least when it comes to one particular distinction between two types of mindsets: fixed mindsets versus growth mindsets.  This distinction was found by Carol Dweck and her colleagues, and dozens and dozens of correlational studies and experiments have found evidence that mindset matters.

Dweck’s book. Haven’t read it personally, but I’ve heard it’s good.

Basically, a fixed mindset is the idea that each person has a fixed trait that determines their ability.  This most often applies to intelligence, but it can be about any skill – so this is the idea that we each have innate talents that determine how good we are at a given activity.  Most people think of IQ this way, as something we are born with that cannot be changed, no matter how hard we try.  On the flip side, growth mindsets are the idea that we can improve our abilities over time with practice, dedication, and hard work, and that we are not limited by innate talents but instead can nurture them over time.   Going with our IQ example, this would be the idea that we can change someone’s IQ with things like education, nutrition, or other environmental factors.

Interestingly, fixed mindsets are tied to performance goals, in other words, trying to demonstrate your ability either to yourself or others, while growth mindsets focus more on improvement and learning, honing that ability over time.  Growth mindsets tend to be better for people both in the short and long term, particularly when they are not very skilled at something to begin with.  Why?  Because if you have a fixed mindset and fail, you are more likely to give up because you think, “I’ll never be better at this.”  On the other hand, if you have a growth mindset and fail, you are more likely to think about how you can improve and do better next time.  Fixed mindsets for people who initially succeed are nice and all (probably ego-boosting, in fact), but the key difference lies in when people fail, which they inevitably will at some point.

People tend to lean towards having a more fixed or growth mindset as a default, at least when  it comes to specific domains such as intelligence or sports performance or just about anything.  However, research has also shown that mindsets can be manipulated – if we learn about benefits of growth versus fixed mindsets, then people can shift their perspectives and benefit from the good things that come with growth mindsets.

Why am I telling you all of this? Well, I think it’s inherently really interesting and challenges a lot of people’s naïve theories on how people work, but it’s also super relevant to ballroom dancing.  Some people have the idea that they’ll wander in to a class, take a lesson or two, and immediately be able to dance, but us ballroom dancers know it’s not remotely that easy.  I would say it takes a year of regular instruction for most people to feel really comfortable with a full repertoire of ballroom styles, and of course many, many more to master them.

For some people, particularly those with a lot of previous dancers (you know who you are, having danced ballet/jazz/tap/etc. basically since being able to walk), ballroom comes very naturally and without much effort or struggle.  Sure, you have to correct a few habits, but learning steps is extremely easy.  For others, ballroom is fun but much more of a challenge!  The pesky alignment thing in standard, learning the difference between all the subtypes of styles, simply remembering what foot goes where.  Feeling like a total clod and thinking that it’s near impossible.  I was there, back in the day.  I had no idea what was happening half of the time, but it was still fun and after a while of mucking around, I realized I would have to put effort, money, and a lot of practice time into learning these skills.  Having a growth mindset is really much more conducive to learning and improving, compared to a fixed mindset.  Yes, _______ is hard, but once you get it, it’s all that much more rewarding.   I do have one caveat – I do think most of us have some innate ability to learn particular skills.  There’s no denying that some people are more “natural” at things than others.   In dance, some people are more flexible or have a more ideal body shape for a particular style or learn steps faster than others do.  However, each of us can make the most of what we have, and sometimes being not so natural at something can produce passion and drive to improve that many of the “naturals” lack.

Anecdotally, one of my friends was better at standard than Latin when he started, placing quite well at competitions in standard.  But he decided, I want to be a Latin dancer.  That’s what he really enjoyed and aspired to be, so he worked hard at it over time, practiced a lot, and got to be a pretty good Latin dancer.   If he had had more of a fixed mindset, thinking he couldn’t get much better at Latin, he might have just stuck to standard or maybe even given up dancing at all.

Every time we advertise the club in effort to recruit new members, I inevitably encounter the same sorts of reasons to not join.  “I have two left feet,” “I don’t know how to dance,” “I could never dance like that,” and so on.  Very fixed mindset, wouldn’t you say?  Hey, that’s where I and 95% of the people in the club started!  People have this idea that ballroom dancing’s some magical power that we just have, but we all start as beginners.  For those who have been dancing some time and can’t imagine ever reaching some level, be patient with yourself.  People tell me, “I could never be as good as you!”  Not true.  A few years ago, I never would’ve imagined myself competing at pre-champ or champ levels, but here I am (at least, in some styles).  It took quite a few years, but it happened.  So, if you ever feel like “ugh, I could never do that,” check yourself and remember that with enough hard work and dedication, you totally could.  Just keep chugging along.

Ballroom in a Few Gifs #3

When someone suggests running “just one more set of rounds”

via tumblr

Tanning.  Every.  Single. Time.

via tumblr

Getting woken up by all the bronze and newcomer dancers getting ready at 4 am

via tumblr

Sitting through countless bronze rounds with no end in sight.

Winning bronze, cause that ish is hard!

via giphy

My reaction to people who double-register at competitions for all four styles.  Or those who are dancing open in all four styles.

via tumblr

Spacing out, then realizing I have to be in line to dance RIGHT NOW.

via tumblr

Trying out some new choreography for the first time at a competition.

via tumblr

Getting a callback!

via tumblr

Thinking we got a callback, but realizing it’s another couple’s number instead.

via tumblr

When the emcee mispronounces a not-so-hard name during results.  Again.

via tumblr

What goes on inside my head when I’ve realized they haven’t called our names yet and there’s only 1st place left.

via giphy

via tumblr

How I actually behave when I’ve realized they haven’t called our names yet and there’s only 1st place left.

 

Decompressing the day after getting home from a comp

via tumblr

America’s Ballroom Challenge Episode 3 Review

The grand finale!  You can see it here.  So this is the ultimate showdown between the representatives from all four styles.  I still don’t get how this is judged (Compare each to the best in the world?  Look at entertainment value? Toss a few coins?), but we’ll go with it.  They will start with a short program, which is supposed to be a more traditional piece that features a typical dance and steps from their respective category, and then a long program that can be more freeform in style.  I don’t think they actually stuck with these guidelines very much, as the long programs seemed to be more thematically traditional.

We start with the Perzhus performing a pretty smooth waltz to a popular song that I hear in competition all the time, “Song for Viola,” which had a sad/ethereal vibe.  It was very pretty but a little sleepy.  Next were Emmanuel and Liana representing rhythm, dancing a fun mambo.   Girl rocks the feathers in a way that most people can’t.  In person, it took three attempts for this performance to work out, due to various technical issues.  Great performance, though I did notice that parts of this routine were exactly the same as from their competition mambo.

Brief break with a super cute mother and son couple dancing a cha-cha.  This kid was ridiculously good, with a lot of star power.

Artem and Inna, the standard couple, gave a kind of bizarre quickstep performance.  They had Inna with lots of extra bust and butt padding, playing a Chiquita banana lady sort of character.  They incorporated some samba steps into their quickstep, to go along with the tropical theme.  I was not crazy about the costuming choice – kind of unnecessary.

Roman and Anna finished up the set of short program routines with an okay cha cha.  Roman entered the floor prancing around in a boa, which I don’t think men should do in general, while Anna rocked a pinstripe jumpsuit overall thing.  Overall, with the short program, I think the American style dancers did the best, which was reflected in their placements:  Emmanuel in Liana in first, Peter and Alexandra in second, Roman and Anna in third, and Artem and Inna in fourth.

Carlos and Dora’s Exorcist piece

We then move on to some theatre arts, woot!  Theatre arts at Ohio Star Ball is great to watch.  It’s definitely acrobatic and lots of stuff that make you go, “what just happened” and “how the hell did they just do that?!” and you don’t often see it in general.  Never at the collegiate level, that’s for sure.  This was actually a competition, but ABC didn’t mention that aspect.  The first performance from Carlos and DOra was an awesome Exorcist-themed dance, which was definitely out there.  I loved it!  Very well performed, creepy, and had good tricks and dancing incorporated into it.  Usually theatre arts stuff just comes in two varieties: romantic flowy themes and intense warrior/tribal pieces, so this was very refreshing.  Justin and Kimalee went next – they’re here every single year and always have a good performance.  They did a romantic piece to Sam Smith that was lovely, with awesome lifts, great transitions, and nicely portrayed emotions.    Third was Shane and Shannon Jensen, a rhythm couple who had some ridiculous transitions.  I think they ultimately won.

Now, the long program!  The Perzhus opened with a fantastic smooth tango, one of my favorites.  It had a flirty, passionate, classic, yet soft feel to it that really worked.  They also had really great musicality.  As a standard dancer, I also really appreciated the inclusion of substantial closed-hold choreography.  The costuming was also fantastic, a nice balance of classic/simple and adorned.  Definitely my favorite out of the bunch.

Emmanuel and Liana went next with a bolero that was very pretty.  I wasn’t sure how to feel about her outfit, which resembled an old curtain/doily.  Artem and Inna followed with a gorgeous foxtrot to Amelie music, which was so much better than their first piece.  Super smooth, ethereal, and technically sound.  Inna is super elegant.  Roman and Anna closed with a pretty traditional paso doble that was great, but lost a bit of steam at the end.

In the end, Emmanuel and Liana took the overall win by placing 2nd in the long program to Roman and Anna’s 1st.  The Perzhus somehow got fourth for their tango, which I thought was b.s.  It was nice for rhythm to have its moment, though.  In the past, I think International style was heavily favored in this all-star competition, so it’s great to see American style becoming more popular and appreciated.

Looking back, some of my favorite performances were:  Max and Michelle’s VW to Sam Smith’s “Not in That Way.”  It might not have been the best dance, but the song and simple feel were lovely, as were the emotional but not overwrought performance.   Artem and Inna’s foxtrot in this episode, as well as the Perzhus’ tango and the Exorcist cabaret/theatre arts (does anyone know the actual difference between the two categories?).  I also really liked the Perzhus’ mambo from episode 1.

Overall, ABC did a nice job of showcasing showcases, not so much of showing typical competitive ballroom.  However, given a general audience, watching showdances is probably more popular and understandable.  I appreciated having two knowledgeable commentators, but wished they could have provided more useful information about how judges might distinguish among the different couples and how things are scored.  From the competitors, I would’ve liked to have seen more creative pieces, but most of them were very nice, generally.  For the whole show, I’d give it a B/B+.

Here are my reviews of Episode 1 & Episode 2